How Many Drivers Could pass their DMV Test Today?

Could you pass the DMV test today?

Actually, most licensed drivers would pass their written DMV test – should they be forced to take it today.

A recent survey by Driversprep.com showed that 3 out of 4 parents to teenagers studying for their learner’s permit passed the pretest. This also means that 1 out of 4 (25%) failed the test. A majority of these parents drove more than 600 miles/month and had been licensed for more than 5 years.

These parents are probably still good and safe drivers. But they might not be of much help to their teen studying for the written knowledge test.

Study for the DMV test together - driversprep.com

That is why Driversprep.com encourage parent and teenagers to study together. Sitting down and doing the DMV practice tests together will trigger important discussions, which will help to make our roads safer for all.

Most Common Driving Mistakes by Teens

As a parent it is important to understand that teen driving fatalities are still high. Motor vehicle crashes kill nearly five times as many teens as cancer or poisoning. Most of these crashes can be avoided. As an example, most teenagers (55%) that died in a crash 2012 were not wearing a seat belt.

A study by the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute showed that 75 percent of all teen driver crashes resulted from three common mistakes.

The number one common mistake is driving too fast. It does not only include speeding over the speed limit, but also driving too fast for conditions such as not slowing down in work zones or on neighborhood streets.

A second common mistake is distracted driving. Any activity that could divert your attention away from the primary task of driving, is a distraction. Such distractions endanger driver, passenger and bystander safety. A driver should always avoid looking away from the road for more than 1-2 seconds.

Third mistake is failing to recognize or react to a hazard. Looking on the road right ahead of your vehicle is a typical rookie mistake. A good driver will constantly scan the road and look well ahead of their vehicle. This comes with experience, but can also be taught in an early phase of the teenager’s education.

4 easy steps to ace the DMV test

Four Easy Steps to a Good Start

As an involved parent, it is a good idea to make sure your teen is off to a good start. The DMV test is not a history test, that can be easily forgotten. A good study strategy is crucial.

1. Get the Handbook

Getting the DMV driver’s manual or handbook from the local DMV office (or downloading it online) is an important step. Make sure you get the latest edition, since contents and laws change over time. It is a good idea for both parent and teenager to flip through it and scan the big subject headings and the smaller chapter titles. This will give you a pretty good idea of what the manual will cover.

2. Make a Study Plan and Set Goals

It may sound boring, but being able to divide the driver’s manual and studies into smaller chunks will help the learning process.

Use passing scores on practice tests as intermediate goals and set a date for the real DMV test.

Remember, most people (adults as well as teens) need at least six weeks to fully grasp the information in the manual, depending on how many hours a day they study.

When you have set a plan and goals, stick to them. Easier said than done, but it can be difference between success and failure.

3. Practice and Read the Manual

After studying the manual, it is a good idea to take a few practice tests. As a teen, it will give you a rough idea of how much you learned and what you have missed. For every question you miss, discuss it with a parent or adult, and go back to manual. Everything is based on the manual and the answer is in there.

4. Prepare with the Final Pretests

When you feel that you have covered everything in the manual, you should be able to take a practice test and score 90% or more. If you don’t, go back to step three and read the manual again. Don’t be lured into taking the practice test over and over again and try to pass by just memorizing questions and answers. Instructors who write the DMV tests will tweak wordings. You will not always recognize questions on the real test, even if the cover the same item.

A Final Word

A lot of statistics show that many students fail their first attempt at the written part of the DMV exam. This used to be true, but has improved significantly over the years. The reason is mainly the free online practice tests that you can take today. Driversprep.com was one of the first sites to offer these test for free and is still the leading authority when it comes to DMV practice tests. Take advantage of these free practice tests and use them as often as you want.

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